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Campus Health is monitoring, advising, and responding to monkeypox in accordance with the latest CDC recommendations. The health of our students is our number one priority. If you have any questions about monkeypox, including questions about testing and vaccination, please visit our frequently asked questions page and/or email monkeypoxvaccine@tulane.edu.

MONKEYPOX REPORTING
Students who are diagnosed with monkeypox by an off-campus physician should use the link below to ensure they are connected with the appropriate resources.

Monkeypox Reporting Form

Monkeypox Student Health Resources

Campus Health is monitoring, advising, and responding to monkeypox in accordance with the latest CDC recommendations. The health of our students is our number one priority. If you have any questions about monkeypox, including questions about testing and vaccination, please email monkeypoxvaccine@tulane.edu.

MONKEYPOX REPORTING

Students who are diagnosed with monkeypox by an off-campus physician should use the link below to ensure they are connected with the appropriate resources.

Monkeypox Reporting Form

 

What is monkeypox?

Monkeypox is a disease that causes a painful rash and flu-like symptoms. The monkeypox virus is part of the same family of viruses that causes smallpox and produces similar, but milder, symptoms.

What are the symptoms of monkeypox?

Monkeypox symptoms include:

  • Fever
  • Chills
  • Headache
  • Muscle aches and backaches
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Sore throat
  • Nasal congestion
  • Cough
  • Rash - The monkeypox rash appears as blisters or pimples that appear on the face, inside the mouth, and on other parts of the body such as hands, feet, chest, genitals, or anus. Some individuals will experience the rash before other symptoms, while others will experience the rash only. A rash will usually appear 3-4 days after fever-like symptoms.

The illness typically lasts 2-4 weeks. Individuals are considered to be infectious until the rash has fully healed with a fresh layer of skin.

How is monkeypox spread?

Monkeypox is spread via direct contact with body fluids, scabs, or rash. It can also be spread through respiratory secretions via face-to-face contact or during intimate physical contact such as cuddling, kissing, or sex. Monkeypox can be spread from the time symptoms start until the rash has fully healed with a fresh layer of skin. Monkeypox has a long incubation period, meaning it can take 4 to 21 days to produce symptoms after being exposed to the virus. Monkeypox can also be spread by touching objects that were recently in contact with the rash or infected body fluids such as clothing, bedding, or towels.

Guidance on symptoms and isolation procedures for students

See a healthcare provider immediately if you notice a new or unexplained rash or other monkeypox symptoms. Avoid close contact with others, as well as pets and other animals, until you are examined by a healthcare provider, get tested and receive the results.

If you test positive, immediately begin isolating and monitoring symptoms until your rash has healed entirely. The isolation period for monkeypox ranges from 14-28 days. You should only leave isolation to visit a healthcare provider or for an emergency. Cover the rash and wear a tight-fitting mask when you must leave isolation. Students who are diagnosed with monkeypox by an off-campus physician should fill out the monkeypox reporting form to ensure that they are connected with the appropriate resources.

Students who live in on-campus housing will not be permitted to isolate in their on-campus residence.  We encourage students to arrange travel home via automobile to complete their isolation. We will provide temporary space while the student makes these arrangements and assist them in any way we can. 

Frequently Asked Questions for Students

How is monkeypox transmitted?

Any close, sustained skin-to-skin contact with someone who has monkeypox can spread the virus. Monkeypox is commonly transmitted during sexual activity, but sex is only one of the ways the virus can be spread. 

How can monkeypox be prevented?

Avoid close, skin-to-skin contact with individuals who have a rash that looks like monkeypox. Avoid contact with any objects or materials that an infected person has recently used. Wash your hands often with soap and water, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer, before eating or touching your face, and after using the bathroom.

What should I do if I have monkeypox symptoms?

See a healthcare provider immediately after noticing a new or unexplained rash or other monkeypox symptoms. Avoid close contact with others, as well as pets and other animals, until you see a healthcare provider and get tested.

What should I do if I test positive for monkeypox?

Immediately begin isolating and monitoring symptoms until your rash has healed entirely. The isolation period for monkeypox ranges from 14-28 days. To tell if a rash has healed, all scabs should have fallen off and a fresh layer of skin should have formed over the area. If you have a fever, congestion, sore throat, or cough, remain in isolation. If you live with others, isolate in a separate room away from other household members and use a separate bathroom if possible. Disinfect all shared surfaces immediately after use. You should wash all laundry (clothes, towels, bedding, etc.) in warm water & detergent. You should only leave isolation to visit a healthcare provider or for an emergency. Cover the rash and wear a tight-fitting mask when you must leave isolation.

Students who are diagnosed with monkeypox by an off-campus physician should fill out the monkeypox reporting form to ensure that they are connected with the appropriate resources.

Students who live in on-campus housing will not be permitted to isolate in their on-campus residence. We encourage students to arrange travel home via automobile to complete their isolation. We will provide temporary space while the student makes these arrangements and assist them in any way we can. 

Students who have financial barriers to arranging their isolation should complete the emergency aid form. Those who contract monkeypox may need to consider a course load reduction or medical withdrawal depending on the severity of their cases.

What should I do if I am awaiting my monkeypox test results?

You should continue to isolate and refrain from close, skin to skin contact until your rash or symptoms have fully healed and a fresh layer of skin has formed.

Is there a monkeypox vaccine?

The monkeypox and smallpox viruses are genetically similar, so the vaccines developed to protect against smallpox can be used to prevent monkeypox infections. The U.S. government has stockpiled two vaccines that can be used to protect exposed individuals from the virus, but supply is currently limited.

What is the vaccination process for monkeypox?

There are two approved monkeypox vaccines. JYNNEOS is the preferred vaccine. It requires two doses, and immune protection reaches its maximum two weeks after the second dose. ACAM2000 is the alternative, single-dose vaccine. Immune protection reaches its maximum four weeks after vaccination. ACAM2000 has more side effects than JYNNEOS and is not recommended for individuals with severely weakened immune systems and other underlying conditions.

Who should get vaccinated for monkeypox?

Currently, there is a national shortage of the monkeypox vaccine. While anyone can contract monkeypox, the Louisiana Department of Health, in response to this shortage, has prioritized vaccinations for two groups currently eligible for monkeypox vaccine: (1) individuals with known exposures as well as (2) individuals with likely high-risk exposures in the last 14 days. To learn more about the current eligibility for the vaccine in Louisiana, visit the Louisiana Department of Health Frequently Asked Questions section of their website.

Vaccine eligibility criteria are set by the Louisiana Department of Health.  Please monitor their website for updates regarding vaccination recommendations. Individuals who believe they meet the criteria for vaccination and are interested in learning more about vaccine availability at Tulane may email monkeypoxvaccine@tulane.edu. Someone will follow up with you individually. Given our limited supply of vaccine, our top priority for vaccination remains people with known exposures to monkeypox patients. If you are interested in recently a vaccine in the community, please refer to this list of  Community Vaccinations Locations within the state of Louisiana.

What is the treatment for monkeypox?

Currently, there is no treatment specifically designed for monkeypox. Because the monkeypox and smallpox viruses are genetically similar, antiviral drugs developed for smallpox can be used to treat monkeypox virus infections. If you have tested positive for monkeypox, consult with your doctor to determine the best treatment plan for you.

How can we lower the chance of getting monkeypox at crowded places and events such as parties, clubs, or festivals?

Keep yourself informed about monkeypox in your area. Consider how much close, personal, skin-to-skin contact is likely to occur that the event you are planning to attend. Minimize skin-to-skin contact with others and avoid tight, enclosed spaces. If you have a rash or feel sick, do not attend any gatherings until you have seen a healthcare provider.

What are safe sex practices to prevent monkeypox?

In addition to standard safe sex practices such as wearing condoms or dental dams, it is important to reduce or avoid behaviors with an increased risk of monkeypox exposure.

  • Exchange contact information with any new partner to allow for follow-up if symptoms occur or contact tracing as needed.
  • Talk to your partner about any monkeypox symptoms and be aware of any new rashes or lesions.
  • If you or your partner have or recently had monkeypox symptoms or a new, unexplained rash, do not have sex and seek medical attention.
  • Limit your number of sex partners to reduce your chances of exposure.
  • Remember to wash your hands, bedding, towels, clothing, and sex toys after having sex.

Where can Tulane students get vaccinated for monkeypox?

If you believe yourself to be at risk and would like to schedule a monkeypox vaccination, please call ahead at the following locations:

  • Crescent Care Health and Wellness Center: 1631 Elysian Fields Ave. New Orleans, LA (504) 821-2601
  • DEPAUL Community Health Center/CARROLLTON: 3201 S Carrollton Ave. New Orleans, LA (504) 207-3060
  • Ochsner Hospital: 1516 Jefferson Hwy. New Orleans, LA (504) 842-3000
  • Tulane University School of Medicine: 1430 Tulane Ave. New Orleans, LA (504) 988-6224
  • University Medical Center (UMC): 2000 Canal St. New Orleans, LA (504) 702-3000

Learn more about monkeypox vaccines.

 

Faculty/Staff Information

What should faculty and staff do if they have monkeypox symptoms?

At this time, testing for monkeypox should be directed to the person's primary care office. Faculty and staff who test positive for monkeypox should immediately isolate at home. Given the long isolation period, faculty and staff should contact their dean or supervisor to determine the best course of action regarding remote work or leave. Employees can also contact their HR business partner with other questions.

 

Related Campus Communications

As more information about monkeypox becomes available, Campus Health will share updates via our social media channels:

Follow @TUCampusHealth on Instagram.

Follow @TUCampusHealth on Twitter.

Follow @TUCampusHealth on Facebook.

Social media posts

Aug. 18, 2022 - What to Know About Monkeypox post

Sept. 1, 2022 - Monkeypox Myth vs. Fact post

Email updates

Aug. 30, 2022 - Campus Health Update - Monkeypox

Other Monkeypox Resources